Distributed filesystem comparison

A file system is an essential component of a computer that provides consistent access and management for storage devices. There are some differences in the file system between different operating systems, but there are some commonalities that have not changed for decades. The access and management methods provided by the file system support most of the computer applications. The philosophy of Unix’s “everything is a file” highlights the prominent position of files. However, the complexity of the file system makes its scalability fail to follow with the rapid development of the internet. This article introduces the architectural design and cons and pros of CephFS, GlusterFS, Google Filesystem, HDFS, MooseFS, and JuiceFS. It also discusses the requirements and challenges of file systems in the native cloud environment.......

Customer Stories: Xiachufang MySQL backup practice on JuiceFS

Xiachufang is one of the first customers of JuiceFS. Initially, they utilized JuiceFS for NGINX logs and MySQL backup, and now using JuiceFS as the primary storage for Hadoop / Hive / HBase, their usage scenarios are quite extensive. Today’s article is highly practical. When we first heard that they used the JuiceFS Snapshot feature to do MySQL backup verification, we also agreed this idea is genius! The Xiachufang team shared the complete technical details in this post.......

Backup NGINX logs on JuiceFS

Previously, we wrote an article about the importance of off-site backup. After a week, Beijing earthquaked at local time about 6 o’clock in the evening. At that time, most engineers were writing their code. Then they said the first reaction to the earthquake was do git push. How smart and diligent! But have you backed up your online data?

There are many data requires backup in our production environment, such as various service logs, database data, user uploaded data, code. Backing up with JuiceFS can save you considerable time. We plan to write a series of tutorials around this topic and sort out a set of best practices.......

Let JuiceFS do your “offsite backup” for you

Regardless if you have data in a in-house solution or public cloud, you can use JuiceFS to perform offsite backup. Just follow our documentation to mount JuiceFS to your host computer or in your public cloud host. Then use standard backup tools, such as rsync, to copy the backup data directly into the JuiceFS filesystem. JuiceFS transmissions are encrypted and will automatically transfer large files in parallel. JuiceFS also handles unreliable public networks – if you’re stuck behind an overloaded or temperamental firewall your data will still get through.......

JuiceFS News: Kubernetes support, faster performance, small file support, new vendors: Microsoft Azure and Netease Cloud

Here are some of the most recent updates to JuiceFS......